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Ontario Tech acknowledges the lands and people of the Mississaugas of Scugog Island First Nation.

We are thankful to be welcome on these lands in friendship. The lands we are situated on are covered by the Williams Treaties and are the traditional territory of the Mississaugas, a branch of the greater Anishinaabeg Nation, including Algonquin, Ojibway, Odawa and Pottawatomi. These lands remain home to many Indigenous nations and peoples.

We acknowledge this land out of respect for the Indigenous nations who have cared for Turtle Island, also called North America, from before the arrival of settler peoples until this day. Most importantly, we acknowledge that the history of these lands has been tainted by poor treatment and a lack of friendship with the First Nations who call them home.

This history is something we are all affected by because we are all treaty people in Canada. We all have a shared history to reflect on, and each of us is affected by this history in different ways. Our past defines our present, but if we move forward as friends and allies, then it does not have to define our future.

Learn more about Indigenous Education and Cultural Services

Research

Participating in research studies is a great – and often fun – way to gain hands-on experience with psychology research studies. These studies are run by our professors and graduate students, who conduct research aimed at furthering a wide variety of scientific missions. They are all safe and fully approved by our university's Research Ethics Board, and provide an optimal way to learn how psychological research is conducted. Study participation is often an optional component of Introductory Psychology (PSYC 1000U), as well as some other 2nd-year psychology courses. The SONA system allows students to sign up and participate in these various research studies, with your log in information being emailed to you during the first week of class, when applicable.
Students viewing brain images in the CANDiLabMany people make bad decisions that bring them in contact with the criminal justice system. The Clinical Affective Neuroscience Laboratory for Discovery and Innovation (CANdiLab) at Ontario Tech University uses cutting-edge psychological and neuroscience methods to better understand what factors cause people to commit criminal, often violent, acts (e.g. antisocial personalities, psychopathy, substance abuse). Students in CANdiLab learn how to diagnose psychopathy, how to administer and analyze MRI brain scans, and how to use these and other methods to better understand the cognitive and emotional factors that lead people to commit criminal acts. For more information on our lab, and on our research, visit the CANDiLab website. 

Students performing an investigative interview in the Alert LabThe goal of the Alert Lab is to improve law enforcement practices through psychological science, with a particular focus on the topic of investigative interviewing. 

Main programs of research currently active in the lab include:

  • Assessment of alibis
  • Improving investigative interviewing procedures
  • Comprehension and utilization of interrogation rights

Researchers at the Development, Context, and Communication Lab investigate a range of research questions about children's and adolescents' cognitive and social development. 

Questions they seek to answer include:

  • What are the best ways to ask children about their experiences to encourage accuracy?
  • How do children's life experiences shape how they view the world and other people?
  • How do peers and friends influence teens' decision-making?